Considering a E-bike purchase?

Usuage of E-Scooter / E-bikes has been rising on the roads of Singapore in part due to their low prices if imported directly from overseas. However, as a parent you might want to put a hold on the purchase of any such e-bikes for your kids anytime soon.

While they are convenient, and like any parents whom wants to pamper their child with the best, there are safety risk to such e-bikes usage.

  1. electrical fire risk: there has been several cases of the bikes catching fire while being charged. for more information read: http://www.stomp.com.sg/singapore-seen/singapore/e-bike-catches-fire-while-being-charged-at-telok-blangah-cresent-coffee
  2. Speed of bike: electrical bike can be modified pretty much easily to travel at speed which as a parent you would not consider safe. At 70km/h the electric bike is already travelling at a speed exceeding that of the speed limit on normal roads in Singapore. For more information read: http://www.stomp.com.sg/singapore-seen/singapore/youth-puts-his-life-at-risk-by-overtaking-bus-along-mandai-road

As per most kid, they would always try silly things without being concern of their safety as such as a parent it is advisable that you take up the responsibility of educating your kid so as to prevent more accidents as we do not wish for more sad cases such as this to occur on the road.

Retirement Saving Doesn’t Have to Be So Stressful

Retirement savings are a critical part of your financial security. Whatever expenses you cannot cover through Social Security, Pension, post-retirement employment or other source must be made up by your savings.

 

160811_RET_SavingsStress
The retirement savings crisis in America is easy to understand from at least one perspective: Most people find building a nest egg to be stressful, and to cope they may avoid it altogether.

The anxiety is found among all ages, according to a Schwab survey of 401(k) plan participants. Four in 10 cited building adequate retirement savings as a significant source of financial stress—ahead of the 24% naming job security, 21% naming paying off credit cards, and 20% naming keeping up with monthly expenses.

Millennials are no exception. Even though they have three decades or more before retiring, 38% said saving for that moment is a major source of stress—ahead of the 29% struggling to keep up with monthly expenses, 26% dealing with credit card debt, and 24% stressed about student loans.

Savers overwhelming accept that they must take responsibility for their own financial future: Nine in 10 say they are relying mainly on their own efforts. This suggests a broad understanding of the poor condition of our pension system—an understanding that probably goes deeper than that of our presidential candidates who are either avoiding the issue or fixating on Social Security.
The candidates are missing a big chance to score with voters: 77% in the Schwab survey said saving enough to retire is a major public policy issue. Meanwhile, Hillary Clinton has only a slight edge over Donald Trump (52% vs. 48%) in terms of which candidate is seen as better on pocketbook issues, Schwab found.

Workers are committed to their 401(k) plans. In the first quarter, just 1.1% of plan participants stopped …

 

Read more: http://time.com/money/4448639/retirement-saving-doesnt-have-to-be-so-stressful/

Social Media Abuse in Nursing Homes

The residents of nursing care homes are seldom loved and taken care of. They rarely go out or are visited by anyone. But what’s worse is that some people inside couldn’t care less.

 

Advances in technology and social media platforms and applications have allowed us to remain connected with one another nearly anytime, anywhere. Caregivers and their loved ones have used these tools as a source of support, entertainment, communication, and much more. But, as with many great inventions, there is a downside to this proliferation of mobile devices and social media. Unfortunately, the law has not caught up with these new technological advances, and vulnerable demographics have fallen victim to those who use these tools without ethical considerations or respect for others’ rights. One of these increasingly victimized groups is elderly and ill individuals who are receiving long-term care services.

March 2016: “A nursing assistant was fired after sharing a photo on Snapchat of an elderly and incapacitated resident with his pants down and feces on his legs, shirt and left hand. The resident had extreme cognitive impairments due to dementia.”

February 2015: “While talking to a friend on FaceTime, the live video chatting service from Apple, a nurse pointed the camera at a resident. At the time of the incident, an aide was washing the resident in bed following an incontinence episode. The aide said the nurse placed the cell phone in the resident’s face and demanded that he/she say hi on camera to the person with whom the nurse had been talking.”

January 2016: “A nursing assistant admitted to taking video of a 93-year-old woman with Alzheimer’s disease sitting on her bed in a bra with no underwear or pants. She shared the video on Snapchat with friends.”

July 2015: “Two nurse’s aides face charges of elder abuse for posting humiliating videos of residents on social media. According to the Lowell Sun newspaper, one video shows an elderly resident sitting on a commode while dressed and being asked about her sex life and if she smoked marijuana. Another shows the same resident sleeping when one of the aides yells in her ear, waking her up.”

September 2015: “Three personal care assistants were fired after an employee took a photo of a resident on the toilet and posted it on Snapchat.”

All of these are actual, reported cases of social media abuse in American nursing homes. In December of 2015 ProPublica released “Nursing Home Workers Share Explicit Photos of Residents on Snapchat,” a report aimed at raising awareness of this new type of abuse in long-term care settings.

 

Read more: https://www.agingcare.com/Articles/Social-Media-Abuse-in-Nursing-Homes-206087.htm

Helping Children with Autism

Understanding what child autism is and is not will go a long way towards helping you cope with it. Children with autism need your understanding of how they see the world, and you can help them best by realizing that.

Improving Emotional Health

There are many things parents can do to help children with autism overcome their challenges. But it’s also important to make sure you get the support you need. When you’re looking after a child with autism, taking care of yourself is not an act of selfishness—it’s a necessity. Being emotionally strong allows you to be the best parent you can be to your child in need. These parenting tips can help by making life with an autistic child easier.

A parent’s guide to autism treatment and support

If you’ve recently learned that your child has or might have an autism spectrum disorder, you’re probably wondering and worrying about what comes next. No parent is ever prepared to hear that a child is anything other than happy and healthy, and a diagnosis of autism can be particularly frightening. You may be unsure about how to best help your child, or confused by conflicting treatment advice. Or you may have been told that autism is an incurable, lifelong condition, leaving you concerned that nothing you do will make a difference.

While it is true that autism is not something a person simply “grows out of,” there are many treatments that can help children learn new skills and overcome a wide variety of developmental challenges. From free government services to in-home behavioral therapy and school-based programs, assistance is available to meet your child’s special needs. With the right treatment plan, and a lot of love and support, your child can learn, grow, and thrive.

Don’t wait for a diagnosis

As the parent of a child with autism or related developmental delays, the best thing you can do is to start treatment right away. Seek help as soon as you suspect something’s wrong. Don’t wait to see if your child will catch up later or outgrow the problem. Don’t even wait for an official diagnosis. The earlier children with autism spectrum disorders get help, the greater their chance of treatment success. Early intervention is the most effective way to speed up your child’s development and reduce the symptoms of autism.

When your child has autism: Tips for parents

  • Learn about autism. The more you know about autism spectrum disorders, the better equipped you’ll be to make informed decisions for your child. Educate yourself about the treatment options, ask questions, and participate in all treatment decisions.
  • Become an expert on your child. Figure out what triggers your kid’s “bad” or disruptive behaviors and what elicits a positive response. What does your autistic child find stressful? Calming? Uncomfortable? Enjoyable? If you understand what affects your child, you’ll be better at troubleshooting problems and preventing situations that cause difficulties.
  • Accept your child, quirks and all. Rather than focusing on how your autistic child is different from other children and what he or she is “missing,” practice acceptance. Enjoy your kid’s special quirks, celebrate small successes, and stop comparing your child to others. Feeling unconditionally loved and accepted will help your child more than anything else.
  • Don’t give up. It’s impossible to predict the course of an autism spectrum disorder. Don’t jump to conclusions about what life is going to be like for your child. Like everyone else, people with autism have an entire lifetime to grow and develop their abilities.

Helping children with autism tip 1: Provide structure and safety

Learning all you can about autism and getting involved in treatment will go a long way toward helping your child. Additionally, the following tips will make daily home life easier for both you and your autistic child:

  • Be consistent. Children with autism have a hard time adapting what they’ve learned in one setting (such as the therapist’s office or school) to others …

Read more: http://www.helpguide.org/articles/autism/helping-children-with-autism.htm

Sleep requirements in children

How much sleep does your child need? This depends on your child’s age, for the most part. Sleep requirements are also dependent on the individual child. Some children don’t need as much sleep as others do.

 

What are your child’s sleep requirements? Even the experts don’t know for sure.

Sleep has a big impact on our well-being, so it’s understandable that parents want to know if their kids are getting enough. Recent research suggests that something as simple as a well-timed nap makes a difference in how much preschoolers learn (Kurdziel et al 2013). Naps may also enhance learning in babies.

But while it’s clear that sleep is important, there is no easy formula for calculating your child’s personal sleep needs. In fact, the most surprising thing about sleep requirements is how little we know about them (Hunt 2003).

The official-looking recommendations we see everywhere, like the ones in the box below from National Sleep Foundation, are often based on studies of how much time people spend in bed. The charts don’t tell us how much of this time is actually spent sleeping.

Nor do they tell us about how sleep varies cross-culturally. Typically, recommendations about sleep requirements are based on surveys of Western populations (e.g., Blair et al 2012; Iglowstein et al 2003; Armstrong et al 1994; Roffwarg et al 1966).

Most importantly, the charts can’t tell us what your individualized needs are.

Knowing how much time people spend in bed is somewhat helpful, but it doesn’t tell us if these people are getting the right amount of sleep.



As the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research has noted, we need large-scale, controlled studies that measure both sleep and biological outcomes (Hunt 2003). Unfortunately, such studies are uncommon.

Notable exceptions are recent studies focusing on behavior problems and obesity.

For example, a study of 297 Finnish families with children aged 5-6 years, researchers found that kids who slept less than 9 hours each day had 3-5 times the odds of developing attention problems, behavior problems, and other psychiatric symptoms (Paavonen et al 2009).

Another recent study tracked the development of obesity in young children.

In that study, researchers recorded the body weights and sleep habits of kids under five years of age. Then, five years later, they measured the kids again.

The study revealed a link between sleep loss and obesity. Kids who’d gotten less than 10 hours of nighttime sleep at the beginning of the study were twice as likely to become overweight or obese later on (Bell and Zimmerman 2010).

Moreover, researchers found that the timing of sleep mattered. When it came

– See more at: http://www.parentingscience.com/sleep-requirements.html

COIT’S GUIDE TO REMOVING INK STAINS FROM CARPET

“Have you been the victim of an ink stain? Try not to explode along with your pen. The written word may live on forever, but an ink stain doesn’t have to be permanent.­ Use these cleaning methods so you can experience a better ending. The first step in removing an ink stain is to identify the type of material or surface that is stained. Then use the following tips for optimal ink stain removal.

Removing Ink Stains from Carpet

Keeping household carpet clean is no easy task. From dirt, to food, to ink stains on carpet, your living room, bedrooms, and hallways are put to the test every day of the week.

So how do you get rid of annoying ink stains that leave your carpet looking dirty? The first step is to take action on the ink stain as soon as possible. The drier the ink, the harder it is to remove, so don’t hesitate once you discover it.

Using COIT’s Guide to removing ink stains from carpet, you’ll have step-by-step instructions to help you tackle tough spots.

HOW TO REMOVE BALL POINT INK STAINS FROM CARPET

If you have natural-fiber carpet, follow these steps to remove the ink stain:

  1. Buy two cans of cheap lacquer hair spray – you may need this much depending on how quickly the stain disappears.
  2. Spray the hairspray onto the ink stain. This will soften the ink.
  3. Using a white cloth towel, blot the lacquer. Do not scrub the stain; instead, repeat this process until the ink stain disappears.
  4. Once the area is dry, hand-brush the affected area and then vacuum. This should remove any traces of lacquer.

Read more: http://www.coit.com/spotremoval/how-to-remove-ink-stains-from-carpet

18 Proven Home Remedies to Get Rid of Mosquitoes

“Getting rid of mosquitoes entirely in your garden may prove very difficult, perhaps  impossible. Treatment of water and taking away potential standing water vessels are the most efficient steps but even if you manage to make your yard completely free of breeding spots mosquitoes can fly in from miles away. Of course misters and repellent devices can add to the mix allowing you to take matters in own hands. Which approach or product will be best will depend on your personal situation. By reading this list in which we dispel myths and list methods that really work we you are setting the first step into a mosquito free yard. Taking action will help you take back your yard so you can spend time with friends and family without the nuisances and health risks caused by these miserable little gits.”

home remedies to kill mosquitoes

Though mosquitoes are small and tiny creatures, they can ruin whole atmosphere. Mosquitoes can cause several dangerous and fatal diseases like malaria,dengue, chikungunya, yellow fever, etc. The market is flooded with several chemical-laden mosquito repellents. These products can help you make your surroundings mosquito-free, but at the same time, they have negative effects on the environment. Here are some home remedies that are not only effective in getting rid of mosquitoes, but are also eco-friendly. Try them out!

HOME REMEDIES FOR MOSQUITOES

1. Dry Ice

The carbon dioxide that we exhale attracts mosquitoes. Dry ice emits a lot of carbon dioxide. So, place dry ice in a container and keep it at a certain distance. When all the mosquitoes are attracted towards that container, close the lid. While this can be a little time-consuming, but it is an effective method to drive away mosquitoes.

Read more: http://www.homeremedyhacks.com/18-proven-home-remedies-to-get-rid-of-mosquitoes/

How to Prepare for a Blackout

“You might have taken steps to make your home more energy efficient, but have you thought about how your household would cope with no electricity? You need to plan ahead by making sure you have alternative forms of heat and light, such as torches fitted with new batteries, candles and matches, battery-operated heaters or portable gas fires. However, be extra careful with open flames in the home; make sure you place them on a non-flammable surface away from curtains and soft furnishings, and never leave them unattended.”

How to prepare for a blackout | PreparednessMama

Sound advice from someone who’s been through several residential blackouts

I think it’s safe to say we’ve all experienced the power going out at some time. In my neighborhood, the lights always go out for a few minutes when there is a storm. A blackout is a power outage for an extended period of time. These are usually caused by winter storms and disasters.  Here is some sound advice from someone who’s been through several residential blackouts. Find out how to prepare before, during and after a blackout.

Prepare Before a Blackout

The first way to prepare for an outage is to help prevent them. Look for hazards that could fall and damage the power lines on your property. The simple act of keeping trees pruned and in good health can not only save your home in a severe storm but also keep power in the neighborhood.

Having a family emergency plan is the most important part of being prepared. Time to get out a pencil and write down where the manual release lever for you garage door is, so you can get in and out without power. Also, now is a good time to hide a spare key outside, especially if you rely on using your garage as an entry way.

Read more: http://preparednessmama.com/how-to-prepare-for-a-blackout/

 

10 Things You Do That Your Dog Hates

“Every dog deserves a warm and loving home. They come into our lives for in many ways: through pet adoption, as a loyal service dog, foster dog turned furry family member, or taken in after being abandoned. Regardless of how a dog becomes family, you love every whisker on their face as well as all the irritating things they do that make you want to pull your hair out. On the other hand, did you know there are a number of things you do that make your dog want to pull their fur out? That’s right, folks! Some of the things you do actually irritates your furry beasts. They just cannot express in words how crazy, unreasonable or how confusing you are being. Let’s take a look at ten things dogs don’t like humans doing, then tally up how many of them you are guilty of — innocently, of course.”

1

Although our canine friends love us unconditionally, there is a number of things you probably do that are driving your dog nuts. In order to keep Fido as your best friend, you need to know what these nasty and annoying habits are and try to get rid of them as quickly as possible.

1. Yelling At Him

Make sure you stop yelling at your dog and try switching to body language. We have evolved over time and became a primarily vocal species.
We simply love talking to and about other people, sometimes even behind their backs, but we need to understand that our pets respond better to body language and physical manifest of emotions, than to verbal communication.

Dogs are able to figure out the meaning of some key words we use daily (words like sit, stay, walk, treat, toy, off…), but they are not capable of completely understanding human language and all the messages it conveys. What they are true experts at, however, is being able to read our body language and decipher exactly what you’re thinking and feeling just by reading your body.

So next time you want to yell come! at your dog, try leaning forward and summoning him with your hand instead. It will work like a charm.

Read more: http://www.dognotebook.com/10-things-you-do-that-your-dog-hates/

11 Natural Ways to Get Rid of Mice

“Mice are small rodents about one inch long, with the typical mouse a brown or brownish-gray color. Mice can squeeze into a home through the smallest crack. Even a hole the size of a dime can admit one or two mice, and that’s all you need for an infestation One pair of mice produce up to six litters of babies per year, with an average of five mice per litter. Within a short amount of time, the typical home or apartment can be overrun with these pests. Often the first thing a homeowner notices that points towards a mouse infestation are holes gnawed or chewed into boxes or bags. If you pull out your loaf of bread, for example, you may notice a hole chewed right through the bag and the edges nibbled off the bread.”

Since the weather turned chilly, you can practically see mice families unloading their little U-hauls and setting up housekeeping in the nooks, crannies and hollows of our walls. Mr. Mod was on a rampage last night disinfecting every square inch of the kitchen. His mice catching technique is the old-fashioned one, not humane at all-peanut butter in a mouse trap.  (I really think he takes pleasure in flinging their limp bodies out into the woods–ick!) For the homeowner in need of kinder, gentler mice-ridding options, there are alternatives to the neck squishing snap. As long as a mouse can get his head through an opening, he can wriggle the rest of his body right on through. Not only do you have to catch them, you also need to deter and block them from entering.They’re and they can carry diseases you want NO part of.

Read more: http://www.curbly.com/users/modhomeecteacher/posts/9297-11-natural-ways-to-get-rid-of-mice