12 Things No One Tells You About the Early Days of Motherhood

Are you living one of the lies of motherhood? This article talks about some open secret during motherhood including the several tips to make this stage effective.

1. You will bleed for a few weeks after.

When I had my first child, I was an adult woman with a college degree and a stack of half-read pregnancy books who had watched numerous episodes of TLC’s A Baby Story, and yet I had no idea that in the days and weeks following childbirth, I would bleed. Sure, I knew my vagina would be tender and sore. But bleeding that was like a heavy, blood-clot-filled menstrual cycle? I had no clue. (Turns out, this is normal. But if you’re worried, always check in with your doctor.) So let it be known to the world: adult diapers and the mesh underpants/magnum-size pads you get at the hospital will be your best friends. Love them. Cherish them. Use them.

(C) Celebrity Babies and Kids - People
(C) Celebrity Babies and Kids – People

2. You will still look pregnant, even when you’re not.

Imagine my shock when, after I pushed an eight-pound human out of my body, I still looked like I was a few months pregnant. The truth about post-baby-bodies is that they don’t shrinky-dink down to their former pre-baby sizes. Your stomach may be round and swollen for a bit after giving birth, and it’s not just extra pounds — your uterus needs time to contract in size. This is normal — not that you’d know it from body-obsessed tabloids — and has become normalized in recent years with women like Kate Middleton showing the world what actual post-baby bodies look like. Embrace your inner Kate and let that sweet baby belly shine.

3. Breastfeeding is not intuitive.

There’s this weird belief floating around (er, maybe just in my head?) that simply because we’re born with breasts means we’re going to naturally understand how to use them once they’re filled to the brim with milk. “Oh yeah,” one thinks, “I’ll just shove these things into my baby’s mouth and the nectar of life shall pass from my boobs to their lips and all will be easeful and joyous!” Nope. Breastfeeding must be learned and practiced, through a crapload of trial and error and painful, nipple-destroying attempts. Don’t beat yourself up if you’re not getting it right away. Seek help from lactation consultants, books, the internet, and friends. Pain should be a red flag — and could be anything from your baby having a shallow latch or tongue tie to you having a clogged duct. There’s no shame in asking for help, and it doesn’t mean you’re doing anything wrong as a mother.

Read more: http://www.redbookmag.com/life/mom-kids/a52662/new-mom-newborn-early-motherhood

 

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